2 min read

Meet Idea Hunt's Youngest Developer

Meet Idea Hunt's Youngest Developer
Maggie Franz

Maggie Franz

Photo by Photo by Soumil Kumar from Pexels

At age 14, Caspian is Coding and Making an impact

At Idea Hunt, we like to work with diverse teams of people to get better, more creative and consequently more well thought out ideas.  We have hired people from different countries, different backgrounds, and even work with people of different ages.

This week, we’ve been thrilled to work with Caspian Morling, son of Idea Hunt’s CEO, and our newest developer.  Caspian has dedicated a week of his Summer holidays to join the Idea Hunt team in our Linkoping office. He’s 14 and already actively coding but not just for Idea Hunt.  

Why did Caspian want to give up a week of his summer holidays, taking a break from playing tennis and video games, to work with Idea Hunt?  Because he’s really interested in programming and happy to get more hands on development, in the business world. Caspian has already taken a dive into coding and is adding to his skillset in different ways.  He’s taking online classes from CodeCademy and has even made his own game on GitHub! Caspian has even participated in and won hunts on our previously live platform for startups.

Caspian attends the International English School in Sweden and already at 14 has an impressive command of the language; which he got to use in many of our meetings, which happen to be international.  While in the office he helped to develop a cleaner way to demonstrate when a coach is working on the platform within the administrator panel, verses the user interface. This was achieved through changing the background color and adding some textual headers.  But he didn’t stop there. Caspian also got to work on one of our new, upcoming tools, an AR tool for innovation.

We asked Caspian Morling what advice he’d give to other kids like him, that want to learn how to code.  He told us that he would recommend taking matters into your own hands and to dive into learning rather than waiting for the educational system to catch up and offer this kind of programming in schools.  He said that it’s important to feel like you can reach out and look for help when you need it, whether this means asking a friend, an adult or searching the internet. Some of his favorite places to look for resources are those like, W3Schools, MDM Web Docs and Stack Overflow.


 

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